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You are here: the::unwired - forum / Thoughts / Thought: 100 KB blocks for GPRS billing - that's not fair at all! Topic closed! This topic automatically closed 30 days after first posting.
#1

Arne Hess

Editor in Chief

From: Munich or Wireless Cyberspace
Registered: 01.01.1970
Posts: 6184

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Contributed by Dr. Wolfgang Irber, PPCW.Net Reader and Business Professional
I'm starting to get very annoyed by this. At home, I'm getting a GPRS bill based on 10 KB blocks, but while traveling, many roaming operators write the bill based on 100 KB blocks. According to my experience, that's a very smart way to use GPRS as an efficient cash cow.
While on the go, I need to stay connected to my E-Mails, so using GPRS is simply a must for me. And GPRS is great; I love it. I'm so glad it is available since it made life so much easier for me. But when on GPRS roaming, I noticed that more and more operators are switching to 100 KB blocks for billing.

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Cheers ~ Arne

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#2

DubWireless

I'm too lazy to register

Last week I asked one of the Operator's I use here (in Ireland) the GPRS roaming charges for Germany as I'll be heading there soon. They attached back a spreadsheet listing all the roaming agreements and billing blocks/prices.

It was interesting reading, Germany and Austria both use the 100KB blocks, although surprisingly places like the USA and Singapore currently bill only 1KB blocks! Roaming GPRS is expensive enough so I agree 100% with you Wolfgang - this minimum 100 KB block is a rip-off - I know I'll be keeping a close eye on the GPRS data counter smile

Although, I've yet to be billed for any GPRS Roaming with this operator, and I've roamed using GPRS in the UK, Netherlands, Germany and the US (albeit very light use). I suppose their billing system had not caught up with the service offering, although I suppose on my next trip it will!

BrianG


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#3

APA

I'm too lazy to register

RIP OFF , it is so easy to summarize their strategy. Since you are a roaming user they don't care if you are unhappy or not, you likely use their service once a year. So they grab you with two hands, shake you as much as they can and then let you go again smile

As mentioned before, my GPRS is disabled permanently. I'm not willing to waste my money, after a while you easily can live without up to the minute emails again smile

We always feel we can't without, but sure we can easily. If your emails generate you more money than you have to spend on GPRS, then turn it on, if not turn it OFF smile


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#4

Wiz

I'm too lazy to register

Thank god for my AT&T Global Network dialer for PocketPC. It works flawlessly on my XDA II, and enables me to dial 0800 tool-free numbers when I'm abroad ..... yes, perhaps only 9600Bps, but hey ... anything to prevent being rippecd-off right?


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#5

Wolfgang Irber

I'm too lazy to register

Hi APA,

Well, I already know that your are not a "believer" when it comes to GPRS:) but when you are away from home for weeks and you do not have any easy access to the Internet at all, it is not the up to minute email that is required but the email at all. In today's business email is used for tracking task and simply replaced all paper-related documentation.

I well remember the time when I was on the road without XDA and GPRS: something I don't want to experience at any time again.

But more and more, I get the impression that I am paying as well for the little use the operators are experiencing on their GPRS networks and they now want to increase their return of investment on expense of customers that do not have a real choice: travelers.

To generally switch off GPRS, I don't regard it as a feasible option, maybe occasionally, but it's certainly all about the prizing. In Germany with my current operator, I have no problem at all, I personally think the relation between KB and prize is kind of fair in the current stage even though I wouldn't mind it to become it cheaper. It is just the roaming that makes me more than wonder and angry.

Let's watch how the prize is going to develop with UMTS. If the operators ever want to target the mass market, the prizes have to come down or the new networks are going to be a very expensive toy... for an exclusive group of business users.

Cheers ~ W


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#6

Thomas Scheen

I'm too lazy to register

Arne,

I can confirm your anger here in Belgium. Proximus charges a whopping 0,50 € per block of 100 kb although one only needs 10 kb for a mail-check or a WAP-News-check. If providers are so kean to promote GPRS as the step before UMTS, they should really rethink their pricing policy.

Example: To resync my Avantgo-channels, I need +-962 kb. That's 5 € !!!!

5 min. TV-straming on n-tv (with poor picture quality) costs 6 € !!!!!!

An unlimited amount of MB for a flat rate of 10 € would be OK.

Thomas Scheen


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#7

darkcell

I'm too lazy to register

I've got to pay USD 3/month for flat rate gprs provided by satelindo...


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