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BANDWIDTH: 3G hits PPCW.Net
Posted by Arne Hess - on Friday, 27.02.04 - 20:19:30 CET under 06 - Site News - Viewed 8048x
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As I've told you a couple of days ago, I'm currently pretty busy with my latest project for a European GSM/UMTS carrier; however - like so often things change and the project I was hired for is currently on hold because of some other exciting developments I'm working on now.
While on hold means postponed only, the new project involves me into 3G/UMTS which gives me some exciting views into the next coming developments and also means that I'm 3G enabled now! :-D
Okay, the device I'm currently using isn't a Microsoft Smartphone or Pocket PC Phone Edition :-( but hey - I get 3G access with some amazing connection speeds and - not to forget - currently I'm collecting information on how to connect a Pocket PC to 3G/UMTS networks :-) which I already tried and used successful! :-D

Stay tuned on some updates here!

Cheers ~ Arne


 

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Comments
Posted by jake on 27.02.04 - 22:11:59

congrat´s on the 3g connection. would like it too. right now im considering if a vodafone umts card for my laptop will make it. main rwason not having it right from the start is price/ing. a lot of money... smile but i guess that´s the price i have to pay...

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typing this on my xda2 from 5 days in wonderfull snow....

Posted by Ramin on 28.02.04 - 04:19:25

Arne, that's great news for Pocket PC (& Tablet PC!) users who have been patiently waiting for 3G... smile  Based on your real-life experience with 3G, I am interested to know if the 3G technology (which you're working with) in its current state is still challenging for the end-user to adopt - e.g. are device settings difficult to configure, are there interoperability issues between devices and telco equipment from different manufacturers? etc.

I understand that you may not be able to delve into specifics, but general comments would be great.  I'm from Malaysia, and our own local mobile telco providers have been promising 3G for a long time.  So far, however, nothing has materialised.  In fact, the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) has stressed to providers that there will be penalties for delays in 3G implementation "to make sure that they did not make empty promises during their bid submission,".

Basicaly, I'd like to learn more about 3G deployment and testing experiences (not marketing talk & promises, but the real nitty gritty) - from the providers perspective and from the end-users perspective.  To understand why it has taken so long.  Why has 3G the technology taken so long to mature?  Or is it still not mature?

I've researched Bluetooth and I understand the complexities behind the scenes - now, I'd like to learn more about 3G.  Many people have said "3G is dead" now that there is WiMax, just like certain people have said that "Bluetooth is dead" because of Wi-Fi (though we know that this is not true!). smile

Also, what are your thoughts about this news article? - "3G signals can cause nausea, headache" @ http://star-techcentral.com...

Well, this is a long (& an exciting subject!)... maybe we should start an discussion thread in the Forums? smile  Cheers!

Posted by Wolfgang Irber on 01.03.04 - 23:26:06

Arne,

Do you actually notice a reduction in re-transmission overhead compared to GPRS? Just in case you monitor the traffic to overhead volume.

But since you are envolved in an UMTS project, you may get the service for free anyway smile

Cheers ~ a very envious Wolfgang

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