Subscribe to the::unwired's RSS Feedthe::unwired at Twitterthe::unwired on Facebookthe::unwired on Google Plus
the::unwired Article
PHILIPPINES: Commercial Wi-Fi services, Bluetooth, Illegal
Posted by Carlo Guerrero - on Monday, 30.06.03 - 18:31:34 CET under 01 - General News - Viewed 9356x
Not Tagged

"As far as the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) was concerned, commercial wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) services, and even Bluetooth use, was still "illegal" in certain regions in the Philippines, including Metro Manila, an official of the regulatory body said over the weekend."

The 2.4 GHz spectrum is currently owned by the Manila Electric Compny (Meralco) for their Supervisory Control and Data Aquisition (SCADA) network. Limitation on the use of the specified frequency in Metro Manila, where the Central Business District is located, may spell stunted growth for IT dependent operations that may benefit from wireless technology.

Current NTC regulations prohibit the use of the spread spectrum technology--which includes Wi-Fi, within the 2.4-gigahertz frequency band. The NTC is also considering the regulation of the Bluetooth wireless technology as it also works on a similar frequency.

There will be a public hearing in July to discuss the guidelines before it issues a directive allowing the use of the 2.4-Ghz frequency band in the National Capital Region (Metro Manila), Region III (Central Luzon), and Region IV (Southern Luzon).

NTC regulations are based on laws passed in the 1930s.

Related Links : [More Information]


 

Related Articles PHILIPPINES Commercial WiFi services Bluetooth Illegal

  • No related articles found.
Comments
Social Sharing
     
This Week's Top Stories
Feeds & More
Awards & More
Recent Discussions
© Copyright 1998 - 2013 by the::unwired® & Arne Hess
All rights reserved!
the::unwired is a registered trademark of Arne Hess.
All trademarks are owned by their respective companies.
All site video, graphic and text content is copyrighted to the respective party and may not be reproduced without express written consent.